veg power

campaign to persuade UK children to eat more veg

role: advertising, website, launch communications

discipline: design / strategy / digital

awards: wirehive 100 – most emotionally engaging content

the
challenge

Vegetables are rarely advertised and their marketing budgets are considerably more modest than ‘unhealthy’ foods. In 2014, the UK food industry’s expenditure promoting foods such as soft drinks, confectionery and snacks for purchase in retail settings was more than £250 million (Public Health England, 2015b). This is seventeen times more than was spent on fruit and veg.

The aim of this campaign was to encourage children to get excited by veg and consume more on a regular basis.

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our
approach

ifour entered the Peas Please creative ad competition, which was open to advertising agencies, students and creative agencies. The challenge was to create a poster that could evolve into a campaign aimed at getting children to eat more veg. Over 60 entries were reviewed and shortlisted by advertising legend Sir John Hegarty and healthy food campaigner Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.

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our
solution

ifour’s winning ad used a superhero concept targeted at mainstream audiences, which had the potential to evolve into a joined-up multi-channel campaign with significant reach. It aimed to help busy parents on a low budget to integrate more veg into everyday routines in fun, quick and affordable ways.

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the
impact

After winning the competition, ifour supported the campaign for free, providing a landing site, animation, social media assets and multiple print formats.

The campaign was launched on 18 January 2018, with significant celebrity endorsement and went viral on twitter, facebook and instagram. The ad appeared in 5,000 locations nationwide, including Co-op branches, projections and graffiti across the UK, poster sites in local communities and in thousands of primary and secondary school canteens across the UK.

Media coverage included Sky News, Daily Mail, Radio Kent, The Grocer, Fresh Produce Journal, Your Local Guardian, Sunday Post, The National, The Edinburgh Reporter and The Drum.